Letter

Scope and Content

Notes

  • Charles Boone (1750-95) entered the itinerancy in 1771 and served circuits in England, Ireland and Wales until 1795 when he was forced to leave his appointment in Plymouth Dock to travel to Exeter for the state of his health. He died on July 20 1795. Boone married while he was stationed in the Seven Oaks circuit in 1777. His wife Susanna was apparently a woman of some means [for her obituary, see Wesleyan Methodist Magazine 1828, 502]. Source: An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Preachers…1739-1818, compiled by Kenneth Garlick, Methodist Magazine 1798, 180-183 and Methodist Memorial by Charles Atmore (London 1801),62-64
  • John Wittam (1738-1818) was born at Sutton in the parish of Kildwick, Yorkshire and was baptised in the parish church on Christmas Eve 1738. He was converted by Revd. William Grimshaw of Haworth and entered the itinerancy in 1767. Wittam served circuits throughout England, Ireland and Wales until superannuation in 1814 to the town of Addingham near where he was born. He died on February 16 1818. Source: Minutes of Conference 1818, An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Preachers…1739-1818, compiled by Kenneth Garlick and information provided by John Lenton.
  • Thomas Westell (c.1719-94) was the son of Thomas Westell, cabinet maker of Bristol. He was apprenticed as a joiner in 1734 and later worked as a cabinet maker and joiner, although by 1786, when he was living in the Stokes Croft area of Bristol, he was being referred to as a gentleman. Westell was one of the original members of the Bristol society founded in 1739. Within two years, he was preaching locally and he attended the first conference of 1744. He never formally joined the itinerancy but did travel for part of each year - in 1744 for example, he was driven by a mob out of Nottingham. Westell remained a Methodist throughout his life. During his final years, he worshipped at Portland Street Chapel. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald Lewis (1995)

From Northwich to [Charles] Boone at the Methodist Preaching House in Seven Oaks. Bardsley heard when he was in Bristol that Boone had married - he wishes them both a great deal of comfort. The same person told him that Boone was embarrassed at getting his wife's fortune - he should make sure that he looks to God to ensure that his soul is not harmed by this money, as that would be a greater loss than all the money in the world. 'If you continue in the Lord's work.you shall want no manner of thing that is good'.

A gentleman friend of Bardsley's would be grateful if Boone could enquire at Petworth after one Samuel Lowe, lately a soldier. Lowe is a Cheshire man and has lately applied to the parish here [Liverpool] for relief - he has been promised assistance as long as he tells the truth. Could Boone make enquiry to see if he is really in distress? If Boone does not go to Petworth himself, perhaps some of the Methodists there might make enquiry.

Bardsley is in reasonable health and the good Lord often blesses his soul.

He thinks that Boone will be happy with his fellow labourers [James Skinner and John Wittam ] - Bardsley's regards should be passed to them.

In a postscript, he mentions that Boone should write to him at the Preaching House in Pitt Street, Liverpool [Bardsley was stationed in Liverpool in 1777]. . He should also let him know how [Thomas] Westell is.

This morning at 11, they had an earthquake here - some of the people ran out of the church and the minister had to stop the service for a while. The shock lasted about a minute, although there does not appear to have been any damage done.

Note

Notes

  • Charles Boone (1750-95) entered the itinerancy in 1771 and served circuits in England, Ireland and Wales until 1795 when he was forced to leave his appointment in Plymouth Dock to travel to Exeter for the state of his health. He died on July 20 1795. Boone married while he was stationed in the Seven Oaks circuit in 1777. His wife Susanna was apparently a woman of some means [for her obituary, see Wesleyan Methodist Magazine 1828, 502]. Source: An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Preachers…1739-1818, compiled by Kenneth Garlick, Methodist Magazine 1798, 180-183 and Methodist Memorial by Charles Atmore (London 1801),62-64
  • John Wittam (1738-1818) was born at Sutton in the parish of Kildwick, Yorkshire and was baptised in the parish church on Christmas Eve 1738. He was converted by Revd. William Grimshaw of Haworth and entered the itinerancy in 1767. Wittam served circuits throughout England, Ireland and Wales until superannuation in 1814 to the town of Addingham near where he was born. He died on February 16 1818. Source: Minutes of Conference 1818, An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Preachers…1739-1818, compiled by Kenneth Garlick and information provided by John Lenton.
  • Thomas Westell (c.1719-94) was the son of Thomas Westell, cabinet maker of Bristol. He was apprenticed as a joiner in 1734 and later worked as a cabinet maker and joiner, although by 1786, when he was living in the Stokes Croft area of Bristol, he was being referred to as a gentleman. Westell was one of the original members of the Bristol society founded in 1739. Within two years, he was preaching locally and he attended the first conference of 1744. He never formally joined the itinerancy but did travel for part of each year - in 1744 for example, he was driven by a mob out of Nottingham. Westell remained a Methodist throughout his life. During his final years, he worshipped at Portland Street Chapel. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald Lewis (1995)