Letter

Scope and Content

Notes

  • Thomas Marriott (1786-1852) was born in Hoxton Square, London, the son of the noted Methodist philanthropist William Marriott. One of his early memories was of seeing Wesley in his coffin. Marriott was educated at Mr Hewlett's school and by the clergyman Mr Pentycross of Wallingford. At the age of fourteen he was apprenticed to David Bruce, cabinetmaker and upholsterer of Aldersgate. Upon coming of age, he was given £3000 by his father to enter the cabinetmaking business in Camomile Street. The business did not prosper and when Marriott's father died in 1815, he left the trade. After his retirement, Marriott took up residence in Windsor Terrace where he built up an excellent library and collection of Methodist memorabilia. He lost a considerable amount of money in 1818 and retired into private life thereafter apart from some successful dealings on the Stock Exchange. Marriott was a devout Methodist all his life. He died in November 1852, leaving £10,000 to the Wesleyan Missionary Society and the residue of his estate to the Worn-out Preachers' Fund. Marriott was married in 1808 to Charlotte Emelie Instell Rance, step-daughter of the Methodist minister Walter Griffith. She died on 19 May 1834. The couple were childless. Source: George John Stevenson, City Road Chapel, London, and its Associations, Historical, Biographical, and Memorial (1872), p.574-576
  • Titus Bourne (1783-1859) was born at Haugh near Alford in Lincolnshire, the son of a prominent local family. He was educated at a public school and worked in an attorney's office before moving to London to complete his legal training. Bourne qualified in 1804 and moved back to his native town where he went into business as a solicitor and banker. It was at about this time that he began to attend Methodist worship and was converted soon after. During the course of the next fifty years, Bourne went on to occupy many of the principal lay offices in the Alford society including Sunday School superintendent, Missions Treasurer and class leader. He was a generous giver to local charities and to connexional funds. Bourne died on June 21st 1859 after a long decline. He was survived by his widow and several children. Source: Methodist Magazine 1859, 959 and Methodist Magazine 1861, 756-758

From Alford to Thomas Marriott at the Stock Exchange in London. Bardsley did not receive the letter until the 13th inst. or he would have written sooner. He is enclosing the following donations towards the [General?] Conference debt; Mr Coalham: £2 Titus Bourne esq.: £1 Mr Tickler: £1 Mr Foster: £1 Mr Riggal: £1 The circuit here is small.

Note

Notes

  • Thomas Marriott (1786-1852) was born in Hoxton Square, London, the son of the noted Methodist philanthropist William Marriott. One of his early memories was of seeing Wesley in his coffin. Marriott was educated at Mr Hewlett's school and by the clergyman Mr Pentycross of Wallingford. At the age of fourteen he was apprenticed to David Bruce, cabinetmaker and upholsterer of Aldersgate. Upon coming of age, he was given £3000 by his father to enter the cabinetmaking business in Camomile Street. The business did not prosper and when Marriott's father died in 1815, he left the trade. After his retirement, Marriott took up residence in Windsor Terrace where he built up an excellent library and collection of Methodist memorabilia. He lost a considerable amount of money in 1818 and retired into private life thereafter apart from some successful dealings on the Stock Exchange. Marriott was a devout Methodist all his life. He died in November 1852, leaving £10,000 to the Wesleyan Missionary Society and the residue of his estate to the Worn-out Preachers' Fund. Marriott was married in 1808 to Charlotte Emelie Instell Rance, step-daughter of the Methodist minister Walter Griffith. She died on 19 May 1834. The couple were childless. Source: George John Stevenson, City Road Chapel, London, and its Associations, Historical, Biographical, and Memorial (1872), p.574-576
  • Titus Bourne (1783-1859) was born at Haugh near Alford in Lincolnshire, the son of a prominent local family. He was educated at a public school and worked in an attorney's office before moving to London to complete his legal training. Bourne qualified in 1804 and moved back to his native town where he went into business as a solicitor and banker. It was at about this time that he began to attend Methodist worship and was converted soon after. During the course of the next fifty years, Bourne went on to occupy many of the principal lay offices in the Alford society including Sunday School superintendent, Missions Treasurer and class leader. He was a generous giver to local charities and to connexional funds. Bourne died on June 21st 1859 after a long decline. He was survived by his widow and several children. Source: Methodist Magazine 1859, 959 and Methodist Magazine 1861, 756-758