Letter

Scope and Content

Notes

  • Samuel Rogers (1758-1830) was born in Lowestoft of Methodist parentage. He was a member of the society for fifty-three years, serving as a class leader for twenty-nine of them. Rogers was subject to very poor health for nearly thirty-six years to the extent that for the last twelve years of his life, he was unable to follow his occupation. Source: Methodist Magazine1830, 359
  • Mrs Brown (1746-1832) of Lowestoft was a member of the Methodist society for fifty-five years and a class-leader for thirty-six. She is described in her obituary as a woman of 'sound sense and deep piety, and was ardently attached to the ministers and the word of God'. For two years before her death she was confined to her home by the infirmities of age. Her husband was also a Methodist and reference is made in the correspondence of Samuel Bardsley to their children. Source: Methodist Magazine 1832, 312
  • Mary Porter (1742-1822) was a member of the Norwich Methodist society for sixty-eight years. She had been abandoned with her mother and brother by her father when very young but had managed to avoid many of the pitfalls of youth. She joined the Norwich Methodists in about 1755-56 and was converted by a sermon preached by Mr D. Wright. In 1777 she became the the chapel-keeper and continued in that office for many years. She was particularly well-liked by the preachers for whom she provided hospitality. At the time of her death on February 19 1822, she was the longest-serving Methodist in the city. Source: Methodist Magazine1822, 480
  • Charles Atmore (1759-1826) was born at Heacham in Norfolk, the son of a ship's captain. After the early death of his mother, he was raised by his aunt and uncle. Atmore was converted by the ministry of Joseph Pilmore in 1779 and became a local preacher before entering the itinerancy in 1781. Despite his youth, Atmore was named to the Legal Hundred in 1784 and was ordained by Wesley for the work in Scotland in 1786. He was President of Conference in 1811 and was actively involved in the establishment of the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society. Source: Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald M. Lewis (1995)

From Sheffield to John Moon at Cherry Lane Chapel, Norwich. [This letter is partly transcribed in a History of Norfolk Street Wesleyan Chapel and Wesleyan Methodism in Sheffield by Revd. T. Alexander Seed (Sheffield Wesleyan Mission, 1907), 47-48]

Moon might have expected to have heard from Bardsley before this and certainly would have done, had he not been very busy since leaving his friends in the Norwich circuit.

Soon after arriving in Sheffield, he set off to 'beg' [raise money] for the erection of the new chapel [Norfolk Street Chapel, opened in 1781]. He travelled through a considerable part of the Hull, York, Scarborough, Newcastle, Yarm and Thirsk circuits, returning to Sheffield on January 19th. The journey was long but the Lord made it a blessing to his soul. He saw many who are the 'excellent of the earth' and he was often much comforted when he was preaching to them. Bardsley received a clear proof of their love by receiveing their very generous benefactions to the chapel - the collection came to about £90. The Lord strengthened both man and beast so that he was unhindered in his journey, although the roads were long and the times of preaching, were frequent. He is grateful that God has delivered him from the affliction that he suffered from while serving in the Norwich circuit.

Bardsley loves this circuit - they have very large congregations in Sheffield and the society increases.

He hopes that Moon has improved in health and peace. Moon must be careful of his health and should take something warm after preaching whenever he can and he must get a flannel waistcoat as soon as possible, if he has not got one already.

They have had a very deep snow here and he was blocked up in a small village for four nights - he was however with kind friends.

As Moon owes him a long letter, he expects to receive one soon. How is the work in Loddon and Lowestoft? How does Messrs [John] Hunt and [William] Crisp get on in Loddon? His love should be passed to them and their wives, and Billy too, if he is still alive. Does Moon go to Yarmouth? His love should also be passed to his dear Lowestoft friends, especially [Thomas] Tripp and his kind wife. He hopes that he will never forget their great kindness to him when he was 'afflicted'. He should also be remembered to his friends Mr and Mrs [Thomas and Mary] Mallet, Mr and Mrs Freeman, Mr and Mrs Smith, Brother Butcher, Sammy Rogers and his parents, Mr and Mrs Brown and their dear children, Brother Stannard and his wife and 'our sister who teaches school and her husband'. His dear love should also be given to Brother Ward and his wife and Polly. Moon should show this letter to [Thomas] Tripp and [Thomas] Mallet.

His love should also be passed to Brother and Sister [Mary?] Porter and his blessing to [their children] Reho and Bonny, to Mrs Garland, George Hey and his wife, Mr and Mrs Kilburn, Mr and Mrs Turner, Mr and Mrs Sidney, Mrs Cushion if she is still alive, Brother and Sister White, Brother James Hey and his wife, Brother and Sister Barnard, Brother and Sister Best, Brother Bowman and his wife. He could mention many more names.

His love should also be passed to Brother and Sister Dennington and all the society at Loddon and to Brother [Charles] Atmore - Bardsley received his kind letter. Bardsley's dear friend Wharton of Lopham should be 'in good earnest' - he was obliged for Wharton's kind letter.

In a postscript, Bardsley asks also that his love be passed to [James] Wood and his wife - he hopes that she loves Norwich. His regards should also be passed to Mr and Mrs Butler.

Note

Notes

  • Samuel Rogers (1758-1830) was born in Lowestoft of Methodist parentage. He was a member of the society for fifty-three years, serving as a class leader for twenty-nine of them. Rogers was subject to very poor health for nearly thirty-six years to the extent that for the last twelve years of his life, he was unable to follow his occupation. Source: Methodist Magazine1830, 359
  • Mrs Brown (1746-1832) of Lowestoft was a member of the Methodist society for fifty-five years and a class-leader for thirty-six. She is described in her obituary as a woman of 'sound sense and deep piety, and was ardently attached to the ministers and the word of God'. For two years before her death she was confined to her home by the infirmities of age. Her husband was also a Methodist and reference is made in the correspondence of Samuel Bardsley to their children. Source: Methodist Magazine 1832, 312
  • Mary Porter (1742-1822) was a member of the Norwich Methodist society for sixty-eight years. She had been abandoned with her mother and brother by her father when very young but had managed to avoid many of the pitfalls of youth. She joined the Norwich Methodists in about 1755-56 and was converted by a sermon preached by Mr D. Wright. In 1777 she became the the chapel-keeper and continued in that office for many years. She was particularly well-liked by the preachers for whom she provided hospitality. At the time of her death on February 19 1822, she was the longest-serving Methodist in the city. Source: Methodist Magazine1822, 480
  • Charles Atmore (1759-1826) was born at Heacham in Norfolk, the son of a ship's captain. After the early death of his mother, he was raised by his aunt and uncle. Atmore was converted by the ministry of Joseph Pilmore in 1779 and became a local preacher before entering the itinerancy in 1781. Despite his youth, Atmore was named to the Legal Hundred in 1784 and was ordained by Wesley for the work in Scotland in 1786. He was President of Conference in 1811 and was actively involved in the establishment of the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society. Source: Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald M. Lewis (1995)