Letter

Scope and Content

Notes

  • George Shadford (1739-1816) was born at Scotter in Lincolnshire, the son of a shopkeeper. As a young man, he enlisted in the militia and served in Ireland. After his discharge, he was converted at a Methodist service in 1762 and commenced preaching in the Epworth circuit soon after. John Wesley invited him to join the itinerancy in 1768 and four years later, Shadford volunteered to work in North America. Shadford travelled widely as a preacher through the American colonies but returned to England when the War of Independence broke out. He was greatly admired by John Wesley and was appointed to the Legal Hundred in 1784. Shadford superannuated in 1791 and lived the rest of his life in Frome, Somerset. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald M. Lewis (1995)
  • William Crisp (fl.1778) was a grocer of Loddon in Norfolk. Crisp and his wife, were among the most active members of the society and often entertained visiting preachers and John Wesley himself on at least one occasion (December 1786). Crisp was the owner of the first Methodist preaching house in the village. Source: The Spreading Flame: The coming of Methodism to Norfolk by Cyril Jolly (Dereham, c.1970), 64
  • Dr John Hunt (1738-1824) was a surgeon of Norwich. He entertained John Wesley during his several visits to the area during the 1780s and was a generous contributor to the costs of erecting the town's Ebenezer Chapel. He is described as 'eccentric but deeply pious'. Hunt retired to the small Norfolk village of Gissing where he built a small chapel on his own property which he subsequently left to the Connexion. He also licensed a house that he owned in Burston for preaching and was himself an accredited local preacher on the Diss circuit plan in 1814. Source: A Biographical Dictionary of 18th century Methodism by Samuel Rogal (Edwin Mellen Press 1997)and The Spreading Flame: The coming of Methodism to Norfolk by Cyril Jolly (Dereham, c.1970), 54

From Loddon to [George] Shadford at Mr Wesley's chapel in Cherry Lane, Norwich [Assistant in the Norwich circuit between 1779 and 1780]. Spiritual matters are discussed. The good work is going on in this area.

If a letter has arrived for Bardsley (and he is expecting one), he would be grateful if Shadford could bring it and leave it for him at Thurlton - Mr and Mrs [William] Crisp are very obliging. Shadford should endeavour to divide himself between them and Mr [John]Hunt [with regard to accommodation] when he comes. His love should be passed to Brother [John] Acutt, Brother and Sister Porter and to any who enquire after him.

In a postscript, he adds that the magazines are wanted - Dr [John] Hunt wants his as does Jemmy [James] Reid of Stratton.

Note

Notes

  • George Shadford (1739-1816) was born at Scotter in Lincolnshire, the son of a shopkeeper. As a young man, he enlisted in the militia and served in Ireland. After his discharge, he was converted at a Methodist service in 1762 and commenced preaching in the Epworth circuit soon after. John Wesley invited him to join the itinerancy in 1768 and four years later, Shadford volunteered to work in North America. Shadford travelled widely as a preacher through the American colonies but returned to England when the War of Independence broke out. He was greatly admired by John Wesley and was appointed to the Legal Hundred in 1784. Shadford superannuated in 1791 and lived the rest of his life in Frome, Somerset. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald M. Lewis (1995)
  • William Crisp (fl.1778) was a grocer of Loddon in Norfolk. Crisp and his wife, were among the most active members of the society and often entertained visiting preachers and John Wesley himself on at least one occasion (December 1786). Crisp was the owner of the first Methodist preaching house in the village. Source: The Spreading Flame: The coming of Methodism to Norfolk by Cyril Jolly (Dereham, c.1970), 64
  • Dr John Hunt (1738-1824) was a surgeon of Norwich. He entertained John Wesley during his several visits to the area during the 1780s and was a generous contributor to the costs of erecting the town's Ebenezer Chapel. He is described as 'eccentric but deeply pious'. Hunt retired to the small Norfolk village of Gissing where he built a small chapel on his own property which he subsequently left to the Connexion. He also licensed a house that he owned in Burston for preaching and was himself an accredited local preacher on the Diss circuit plan in 1814. Source: A Biographical Dictionary of 18th century Methodism by Samuel Rogal (Edwin Mellen Press 1997)and The Spreading Flame: The coming of Methodism to Norfolk by Cyril Jolly (Dereham, c.1970), 54