Tract on the state of Ireland by Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon

Archive Collection

Scope and Content

Manuscript volume, 1640-1678, containing a [transcript of a] tract by Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon, entitled 'A short view of the state of Ireland from the yeare 1640 to the yeare 1652. A vindication of his late majestie of blessed memory, our Soveraigne Lord the King that now is, and their Majesties supreme minister. Instructed by them for the conducting the affaires of Ireland from the scandalls and imputations cast upon them by many scandalous Pamphletts sett forth in latine by Anonymous writers and particularly against a pamphlet lately published by the direction of a Titular Bishop of Ferns and composed by him'. This was a vindication of James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde and the peace he made twice with the Confederate Catholics in Ireland. According to a colophon, the manuscript was finished on 5 Mar 1678. A note in the margin attributes the tract to Hyde. Also contained in the volume are three puritan tracts, namely an unfinished history of ancient civilisations based on the Old Testament, comments on the historical origins of Roman Catholic Bishops and Popes, and a short description of idolatry and superstition.

Administrative / Biographical History

Edward Hyde (1609-1674) was a member of the Short Parliament (April-May 1640), called to finance Charles I's war against Scotland, and the Long Parliament, which opposed Charles during the Civil War. Hyde worked behind the scenes as an adviser of the crown, recommending moderate measures, but was thwarted, however, when Charles I attempted to arrest five members of Parliament in Jan 1642. Joining Charles I at York in May 1642, Hyde became a member of the Royalist council of war, though he never participated in the ensuing conflict. He remained moderate in his views, and, as Chancellor of the Exchequer and a Privy Councillor, tried to reduce the influence of the military leaders and mediate between the two sides. He was appointed guardian to the Prince of Wales (later King Charles II) in 1645 and removed from active political office. Following the death of Oliver Cromwell in 1658, Hyde (appointed Chancellor that year), answered the overtures of the Presbyterians for a restoration of the monarchy in the Declaration of Breda (1660). As Lord Chancellor of the new Parliament, he unsuccessfully pressed for the disbanding of the army, religious tolerance, and a lack of royalist vengeance. Hyde was created Earl of Clarendon in 1661, and became linked more closely to the Royal family upon his daughter Anne's marriage to James, Duke of York. In Aug 1667, Clarendon, used as a scapegoat for the disastrous Anglo-Dutch War of 1665, was dismissed from the House of Commons and impeached. He spent the remainder of his life in exile in France, and died there in 1674.

Arrangement

Single item.

Conditions Governing Access

Access to this collection is unrestricted for the purpose of private study and personal research within the supervised environment and restrictions of the Library's Palaeography Room. Uncatalogued material may not be seen. Please contact the University Archivist for details.

Acquisition Information

Part of the Goldsmith's Library of Economic Literature, initially collected by Herbert Somerton Foxwell and presented by the Goldsmith's Company to the University of London in 1903.

Other Finding Aids

Collection level description.

Physical Characteristics and/or Technical Requirements

Manuscript folio. Bound in vellum.

Archivist's Note

Compiled by Sarah Smith as part of the RSLP AIM25 Project.

Separated Material

The Bodleian Library, Oxford University, holds correspondence and papers (MSS Clar dep), correspondence with Sir Henry Coventry and Denzil Holles, 1st Baron Holles, 1664-1667 (Ref: MS Clarendon 159), and letters to Gilbert Sheldon, Archbishop of Canterbury (Ref: MS Add c303); the British Library, London, has correspondence and papers (Ref: Add MSS 10614, 14269, 32093-94, 33233, 34727), papers relating to his impeachment (Ref: Harleian MSS), and a manuscript copy of 'A short view of the state of Ireland from the yeare 1640 to the yeare 1652' (Ref: EG MS 1625); the Archivist and Librarian to the Marquess of Bath holds miscellaneous family correspondence and related material; St John's College Library, Cambridge University, contains correspondence with John Barwick, Dean of St Paul's, 1659-1660; the Valance House Museum, Barking and Dagenham Public Libraries, holds letters to Sir Richard Fanshawe, 1st Baronet, 1659-1663; Hertfordshire Archives and Local Studies contain correspondence with Sir H Grimstone, 1666 (Ref: D/EV); the Record Office for Leicestershire, Leicester and Rutland holds correspondence with the Earl of Winchelsea, 1660-1666 (Ref: DG7); Cambridge University Library has copies of 'A short view of the state of Ireland from the yeare 1640 to the yeare 1652' (Ref: Add 4347-48); Trinity College, Dublin, holds a copy of 'A short view of the state of Ireland from the yeare 1640 to the yeare 1652' (Ref: MS 658).

Conditions Governing Use

Copies may be made, subject to the condition of the original. Copying must be undertaken by the Palaeography Room staff, who will need a minimum of 24 hours to process requests.

Custodial History

This manuscript is inscribed 'Henry Ware' (seventeenth century) and 'John Edgar Ker, Willingthorpe, Herts' (nineteenth century). It was bought by Herbert Somerton Foxwell.

Bibliography

Hyde's tract was published as History of the rebellion and civil wars in Ireland (Dublin, 1719).

Geographical Names