ALS to J.C. Carlile

Scope and Content

Manuscript letter, in which Glover writes that he was meant to go to Manchester on the 6th March to lecture on Euripides and to preach at the Union Chapel. However, since the 5th March, he has been in bed with a cold all day or at least for part of the day. He lectured two days ago and presented four men for M.A. degrees in the Senate House. Next week, he will go to Bristol to speak for Sammy Hughes at the Free Church Council. Carlile will have heard about Glover and his confederates, who at the Cambridge Association Committee did not endorse Aubrey's scheme. Glover sent Carlile a long letter at the beginning of February and he didn't answer. The Vice-Chancellor says that the officials of Cambridge University will have to wait on the King on 2nd April. On 1st July, Glover will receive his Litt.D. from Trinity College, Dublin. This was announced in the 'Irish Times' several weeks ago, but the news has yet to reach England. On 15th July, he will sail to Canada to lecture in Ottowa.

Administrative / Biographical History

Glover was the eldest son of Richard Glover, a Baptist minister from Bristol. He was admitted to St John's as a scholar in 1888 and, after gaining a first in both parts of the Classical Tripos, was elected a Fellow of the College in 1892. Four years later he went to Canada to take up the post of Professor of Latin at Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario. He returned to St John's as a teaching Fellow in 1901, and in 1911 was appointed to a University Lectureship in ancient history. He held the post of Orator at Cambridge, and was twice Proctor.
Glover was a prolific author. Many of his books and essays were on a classical theme, 'Studies in Virgil' (1904), 'Herodotus' (1924), 'Democracy in the Ancient World' (1927), and 'Greek Byways' (1932) being just a few of his titles. His restless intellect also took in other themes. 'Poets and Puritans' (1915) included essays on Bunyan and Boswell. 'The Jesus of History' (1917) made Glover's name known to thousands of non-classicists, while 'A corner of Empire: the old Ontario Strand' (1937) reflected his deep love of Canada, fostered during his five years' residence. Glover was also known as an avid letter writer, his thoughts on many subjects appearing frequently in the pages of 'The Times'. A deeply religious man, Glover was immensely proud of being elected to the post of President of the Baptist Union in 1924.

Note

Glover was the eldest son of Richard Glover, a Baptist minister from Bristol. He was admitted to St John's as a scholar in 1888 and, after gaining a first in both parts of the Classical Tripos, was elected a Fellow of the College in 1892. Four years later he went to Canada to take up the post of Professor of Latin at Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario. He returned to St John's as a teaching Fellow in 1901, and in 1911 was appointed to a University Lectureship in ancient history. He held the post of Orator at Cambridge, and was twice Proctor.
Glover was a prolific author. Many of his books and essays were on a classical theme, 'Studies in Virgil' (1904), 'Herodotus' (1924), 'Democracy in the Ancient World' (1927), and 'Greek Byways' (1932) being just a few of his titles. His restless intellect also took in other themes. 'Poets and Puritans' (1915) included essays on Bunyan and Boswell. 'The Jesus of History' (1917) made Glover's name known to thousands of non-classicists, while 'A corner of Empire: the old Ontario Strand' (1937) reflected his deep love of Canada, fostered during his five years' residence. Glover was also known as an avid letter writer, his thoughts on many subjects appearing frequently in the pages of 'The Times'. A deeply religious man, Glover was immensely proud of being elected to the post of President of the Baptist Union in 1924.

Additional Information

Published