ALS to his parents, Richard and Anne Glover

Scope and Content

Describes the failure of a lecture that he and Mr P. A. Goold attempted to give to the soldiers at the Jutogh Barracks near Simla. Asks them to preserve his poetry published in the 'Westminister' as well as the 'Rangoon Times'. Details his plans to travel to Hoshangabad and stay with Jack Hoyland, then travel on to Poona. Mentions his meeting with J. H. Towle, principal of the Mohammedan College at Aligarh, and his wife, Rosie Heelas, who knew Bessie at Mrs Badock's in Bristol. Mentions Maggie Heelas, also married to a man in India. Complains about muslims he has met or heard of. Sends news of C. F. Angus, brother Christopher and his cousin Harold. Describes Simla and the surrounding countryside. Describes dinner with G. T. Walker, a meteorologist who attended Trinity College, Cambridge.

Administrative / Biographical History

Glover was the eldest son of Richard Glover, a Baptist minister from Bristol. He was admitted to St John's as a scholar in 1888 and, after gaining a first in both parts of the Classical Tripos, was elected a Fellow of the College in 1892. Four years later he went to Canada to take up the post of Professor of Latin at Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario. He returned to St John's as a teaching Fellow in 1901, and in 1911 was appointed to a University Lectureship in ancient history. He held the post of Orator at Cambridge, and was twice Proctor.
Glover was a prolific author. Many of his books and essays were on a classical theme, 'Studies in Virgil' (1904), 'Herodotus' (1924), 'Democracy in the Ancient World' (1927), and 'Greek Byways' (1932) being just a few of his titles. His restless intellect also took in other themes. 'Poets and Puritans' (1915) included essays on Bunyan and Boswell. 'The Jesus of History' (1917) made Glover's name known to thousands of non-classicists, while 'A corner of Empire: the old Ontario Strand' (1937) reflected his deep love of Canada, fostered during his five years' residence. Glover was also known as an avid letter writer, his thoughts on many subjects appearing frequently in the pages of 'The Times'. A deeply religious man, Glover was immensely proud of being elected to the post of President of the Baptist Union in 1924.

Note

Glover was the eldest son of Richard Glover, a Baptist minister from Bristol. He was admitted to St John's as a scholar in 1888 and, after gaining a first in both parts of the Classical Tripos, was elected a Fellow of the College in 1892. Four years later he went to Canada to take up the post of Professor of Latin at Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario. He returned to St John's as a teaching Fellow in 1901, and in 1911 was appointed to a University Lectureship in ancient history. He held the post of Orator at Cambridge, and was twice Proctor.
Glover was a prolific author. Many of his books and essays were on a classical theme, 'Studies in Virgil' (1904), 'Herodotus' (1924), 'Democracy in the Ancient World' (1927), and 'Greek Byways' (1932) being just a few of his titles. His restless intellect also took in other themes. 'Poets and Puritans' (1915) included essays on Bunyan and Boswell. 'The Jesus of History' (1917) made Glover's name known to thousands of non-classicists, while 'A corner of Empire: the old Ontario Strand' (1937) reflected his deep love of Canada, fostered during his five years' residence. Glover was also known as an avid letter writer, his thoughts on many subjects appearing frequently in the pages of 'The Times'. A deeply religious man, Glover was immensely proud of being elected to the post of President of the Baptist Union in 1924.

Additional Information

Published