Records of London Greenpeace

Archive Collection

Scope and Content

Press cuttings, circulars, correspondence, newsletters. Mainly relating to nuclear testing, in particular French tests in Polynesia.

Administrative / Biographical History

London Greenpeace was an anarchist collective formed in 1971, initially campaigning against nuclear testing, later tackling a wide range of environmental and anti-militarist issues. Their activities during the 1970s included “street theatres, leaflettings, ring-ins, an international London-Paris walk opposing French atmospheric [nuclear] tests”. They rejected an invitation to become involved with the new centralised bodies Greenpeace UK and Greenpeace International in 1977, deciding to remain autonomous. In the late 1970s and 1980s, the group opposed the environmental and social impact of international capitalism, with campaigns focussing on the City of London, the World Bank and McDonalds Corporation; legal action by the latter against five of the group’s supporters became the long-running McLibel Case. Participants in London Greenpeace decided to wind up its activities in 2001, feeling that administration and extensive correspondence were overwhelming the original purpose of the group.

Conditions Governing Access

Available to researchers, by appointment. Access to archive material is subject to preservation requirements and must also conform to the restrictions of the Data Protection Act and any other appropriate legislation.

Acquisition Information

Donated to Commonweal in 1983.

Other Finding Aids

Unpublished boxlist.

Archivist's Note

Described by Alison Cullingford.

Conditions Governing Use

Copies may be supplied or produced at the discretion of Special Collections staff, subject to copyright law and the condition of the originals. Applications for permission to make published use of any material should be directed to the Special Collections Librarian in the first instance. The Library will assist where possible with identifying copyright owners but responsibility for ensuring copyright clearance rests with the user of the material.

Corporate Names