South African Federation: Natal Referendum, 1909

Archive Collection

Scope and Content

Leaflets concerning the Referendum Act 1909 and the Constitution Bill in Natal, including leaflet on the Transvaal and Mozambique agreement; leaflet on supposed Dutch dominance; leaflet issued by the Natal League, proposing the rejection of the Act of Union; leaflet urging workmen to vote against the Closer Union Draft Act; leaflet 'Union and the Empire', proposing the acceptance of the Act of Union because of German naval and colonial expansion; leaflet from the Durban Closer Union Society urging a 'vote for Union'.

Administrative / Biographical History

The first European settlers in Natal were a party of British traders who came from Cape Town in 1824, and were given a concession of land by the Zulus. In 1838 some of the Dutch emigrant farmers who made the Great Trek settled there. Two years leater they proclaimed the Republic of Natalia, which the British Government refused to recognise. They eventually surrended after defeat by the British. In 1845 the colony was proclaimed a dependency of the Cape of Good Hope, and in 1856 it became a separate British colony, with limited self government. In 1907 'responsible government' was granted, and following the referendum in 1909 Natal became one of the four original provinces of the Union of South Africa.

Arrangement

1 file.

Conditions Governing Access

Open although advance notice should be given. Access to individual items may be restricted under the Data Protection Act or the Freedom of Information Act.

Acquisition Information

The souce of acquisition by ICS is not known.

Other Finding Aids

See link to repository catalogue.

Archivist's Note

Compiled by Alan Kucia as part of the RSLP AIM25 Project.

Conditions Governing Use

A photocopying service is available, at the discretion of the Library staff. Copies are supplied solely for research or private study. Requests to publish, or to quote from original material should be submitted to the Information Resources Manager.