Society records of the Methodist Church, York, Central Mission

Scope and Content

Minute book of the Provisional Committee, 1902-1903; list of subscribers to New Street Wesleyan site, 1903-1908.

Administrative / Biographical History

The Central Mission, York, was created as an independent, non-sectarian mission by two members of York, Centenary Chapel, then part of the Wesleyan Methodist Connexion.

Its precise origin date is unclear but it was certainly active by 1892 when its members organised a Christmas dinner for 1000 poor children of York. The organising committee included Sir Joseph Terry of the confectionery manufacturer Terry's of York.

After 1904 the Mission was based at Layerthorpe Methodist Mission, before moving to the Festival Concert Rooms in Museum Street and then, after 1908, to the New Street Methodist Chapel. Between 1910 and 1919 the Mission occupied a new building, the City of York Central Mission Hall in Swinegate.

In 1919 the Mission was amalgamated with Monk Bar United Methodist Chapel and relocated to the chapel building, which was subsequently known as Monk Bar Central Mission.

Following the unification of the Primitive, Wesleyan and United Methodist Churches in 1932, the Monk Bar chapel was closed and the building sold to the Pentecostalists. The Central Mission subsequently united with York City Mission.

Conditions Governing Access

Records are open to the public, subject to the overriding provisions of relevant legislation, including data protection laws. 24 hours' notice is required to access photographic material.

Acquisition Information

The archive was deposited at the Borthwick Institute in the 1980s.

Note

The Central Mission, York, was created as an independent, non-sectarian mission by two members of York, Centenary Chapel, then part of the Wesleyan Methodist Connexion.

Its precise origin date is unclear but it was certainly active by 1892 when its members organised a Christmas dinner for 1000 poor children of York. The organising committee included Sir Joseph Terry of the confectionery manufacturer Terry's of York.

After 1904 the Mission was based at Layerthorpe Methodist Mission, before moving to the Festival Concert Rooms in Museum Street and then, after 1908, to the New Street Methodist Chapel. Between 1910 and 1919 the Mission occupied a new building, the City of York Central Mission Hall in Swinegate.

In 1919 the Mission was amalgamated with Monk Bar United Methodist Chapel and relocated to the chapel building, which was subsequently known as Monk Bar Central Mission.

Following the unification of the Primitive, Wesleyan and United Methodist Churches in 1932, the Monk Bar chapel was closed and the building sold to the Pentecostalists. The Central Mission subsequently united with York City Mission.

Other Finding Aids

A typescript finding aid, to file level, is available for consultation in the searchroom of the Borthwick Institute.

Archivist's Note

Created by S. A. Shearn, 21.11.16.

Conditions Governing Use

A reprographics service is available to researchers subject to the access restrictions outlined above. Copying will not be undertaken if there is any risk of damage to the document. Copies are supplied in accordance with the Borthwick Institute for Archives' terms and conditions for the supply of copies, and under provisions of any relevant copyright legislation. Permission to reproduce images of documents in the custody of the Borthwick Institute must be sought.

Accruals

Further accruals are not expected.

Related Material

The records of Monk Bar Chapel, York, are also deposited at the Borthwick Institute.

Additional Information

Published

GB193

Subjects