National Archive for the History of Computing: Armament Research Establishment Collection

Archive Collection

Scope and Content

The material comprises:

  • D1, S.M. Sims, On the possibility of coupling two National Accounting Machines. Physical Research Division. Kent. Memo. Number 18/48, November 1948;
  • D2, K.N. Dodd, The Ferranti Electronic Computer (Parts 1 and 2: The Mark I. Model). Applied Mathematics and Mechanics Division, Report number 10/53, April 1953. (4 copies);
  • D3, K.N. Dodd, The Ferranti Electronic Computer (Parts 3, 4 and 5: The Mark I Model. Applied Mathematics and Mechanics Division, Report 11/53, May 1953. (3 copies);
  • D4, H.J. Gawlik, A Comprehensive Input System for AMOS. Applied Mathematics and Mechanics Division, Memo 9/54, June 1954. (2 copies);
  • D5, F.J. Berry, Catalogue of Amos Library Subroutines. Branch Memorandum B4/2/55;
  • D6, F.J. Berry, Catalogue of Amos Library Subroutines. Supplement 1. Branch Memorandum B4/3/55;
  • D7, H.J. Gawlik, A New and Enlarged Version of the Amos Input System. Branch Memorandum B4/1/56;
  • D8, F.J. Berry, Handbook of AMOS Library Subroutines. Applied Mathematics and Mechanics Division, A.R.D.E. Report (B) 15/56. August 1956. (2 copies);
  • D9, F.J. Berry, Intercode: An Easy Way of Using the Digital Computer AMOS. (B4), Branch Memorandum B4/3/57;
  • D10, H.J. Gawlik and F.J. Berry, MIRFAC/80 Users' Manual. July 1970. D11 H.J. Gawlik and F.J. Berry, Some Applications of the Programming Language MIRFAC. August 1970.

Administrative / Biographical History

Set up in the late 1940's the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment was set by the Ministry of Supply, to undertake scientific and technical research into atomic weapons and the testing of Britain's atomic bombs. Scientific and technical work on the British atomic weapons project was initially the responsibility of the Ministry of Supply Research Division at Woolwich and the Armament Research Establishment [ARE] at Fort Halstead in Kent, the headquarters being based at the Kent site. In the late 1940's and ealry 1950's Dr Alec Glennie of ARE used the Feranti Mark I computer at Manchester University in his extensive calculations for atomic weapons.

Conditions Governing Access

The collection is open to any accredited reader.

Note

Description compiled by Jo Klett, project archivist, with reference to http://www.catalogue.nationalarchives.gov.uk/DisplayCatalogueDetails.asp?CATID=111&CATLN=1&FullDetails=True&accessmethod=7 and S.H. Lavington, Early British Computers (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1980) pp. 40-41.

Geographical Names